Building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place

Celebrate Girl Scout Week

By Lisa Kaminski; Manager, Community Recruitment

nypenn_2-color_crGirl Scout Week is celebrated each year, in March starting on Girl Scout Sunday and ending on Girl Scout Sabbath, and always includes March 12th, the birthday of Girl Scouting.

This year it will be celebrated March 6-12th.

Girl Scout Sunday and Sabbath give girls an opportunity to explore different faiths, attend their place of worship, and be recognized as Girl Scouts. Girls may perform community services for the place of worship as well.

A great way to share the message of Girl Scouts with the community during this week is to host a Girl Scout cookies and milk reception, after worship services. Troops can donate cookie and milk to share with parishioners, maybe have a cookie booth sale there as well, and share information about volunteering and how to join a troop.

Other ideas for Girl Scout week are learning more about WAGGGS – the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts, learning about the Juliette Low World Friendship Fund, and taking part in community service or take action projects

For more information about Girl Scouts, and Girl Scout week, visit the council website at http://www.gsnypenn.org

By: Kim Dunne, Media Manager

engineeringHow would you like to make liquid nitrogen ice cream? How about creating your own marble rollercoaster? Then you’ll want to make plans to participate in Girl Scout Engineering Day!

The Biomedical Engineering Society at Cornell University will be hosting the day on March 19. It will consist of many exciting, engaging activities designed to promote engineering, science, creativity, and teamwork. It’s open to Girl Scouts in grades 2-12. There are two sessions you can choose from, the morning session is 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. and the afternoon session is 1-4:30 p.m.

The cost to attend is $2 per girl and girls will receive an Engineering Day patch.

If you are interested in attending, e-mail gsengineeringcornell@gmail.com with the following information: Name, phone number, and e-mail for the troop leader(s), exact number of girls expected to attend, grade levels of all girls, and pick the morning or afternoon session.

Only 70 girls are being accepted per session and slots will be filled first come first served. Don’t miss this exciting day!

By: Kim Dunne, Media Manager

centennialAshley Van Slyke is holding a religious tolerance event in DeWitt to earn her Girl Scout Gold Award, and you’re invited to attend!

With knowledge, faith, communication, and interaction, we, as a generation can begin to address the problem of religious tolerance that paralyzes our world today. You can come with your friends and meet new friends from youth groups of other religions all over Syracuse to interact, learn, have fun, laugh, and discuss how to improve religious tolerance among our friends, in our communities, and across the world.

It’s taking place Sunday, February 28 at the DeWitt Community Church from 6:30-8:30 p.m.

If you’re planning on attending, e-mail Ashley at ajvanslyke12@gmail.com so she knows how many people to expect.

What are you doing to earn your Girl Scout Gold Award? Share details and photos to kdunne@gsnypenn.org.

By: Kim Dunne, Media Manager

Troop 41007 badge1The Girl Scouts from Troop 41007 from Arkport spent time learning about philanthropy in order to earn the Philanthropist badge!

The girls spent a month on the badge and brought in canned goods every week. On the last day they took the food to their local food bank in Hornell. While there they were able to take a tour and find out why and where the food they collected goes.

Way to go girls! What are your girls doing to help out their communities? E-mail details and pictures to kdunne@gsnypenn.org.

Troop 41007 badge2

Three things for Thursday

By Lisa Kaminski; Manager, Community Development

nypenn_2-color_crFeel like you’ve been cooped up inside lately? Wanting to connect with other Girl Scout volunteers and have some fun? Why not register for Cabin Fever in the Corning area!

The adult volunteer training event is taking place on February 27th and here are three things you can learn by participating:

Troop management — have questions on how to run a troop meeting, paperwork, planning activities? This is the workshop for you!

First Aid and CPR — need to update your troop first aid certification? There is an additional fee for this course.

Ceremonies and Traditions — want to plan amazing ceremonies for your troop or service unit? Want to learn some of the traditions in Girl Scouts? Join us and have some fun while learning!

For more information or to register for this event, visit the council website at http://www.gsnypenn.org

 

World Thinking Day

By Lisa Kaminski; Manager, Community Recruitment

thinking dayAs a Girl Scout you are part of a network of girls and women around the globe and each year we celebrate this connection on February 22, World Thinking Day.

This year the theme for World Thinking Day is “Connect”.

This is a day to explore and celebrate all of the connections that make our lives fuller and happier. A day to connect with yourself, with your friends, with your communities, and with the world.

There are some amazing activities on the Girl Scouts website, http://www.girlscouts.org, for girls to take part in and learn about connecting with others. From keeping a happiness diary, to having an invite a friend to Girl Scouts event, to making the world a better place through a community take action project.

There’s even a Thinking day Award patch for girls to earn by completing different activities.

So, start planning, find ways to connect, and celebrate this year’s World Thinking Day!

For more information about Girl Scouts visit the NYPENN website at http://www.gsnypenn.org

 

From the Girl Scouts of the USA Blog:

black history monthWhen you think about history, it’s likely that you think about things that happened a long time ago, perhaps even in a land far, far away. But the truth is, history is happening right now – it’s all around us, and it vibrates through the very fabric of the Girl Scout movement. Think about it: Girl Scouts all over the country are in the process of making history in their schools and communities, instituting meaningful change, standing up for what’s right, breaking records, and setting new precedents.

All of this is why when we celebrate Black History Month, as we’re so excited to do this month, we not only honor and remember the phenomenal black women we learned about in our history books in school – we also celebrate the ongoing strength and vision of the black girls and women who are creating change as we speak.

Just take a minute to think about the black women, both you and more experienced at life, who’ve made headlines in the past few years:

  • In 2014, Mo’ne Davis, then 13, wasn’t just the first African American girl to play in the Little League World Series, she was also the first girl to pitch a shutout in the competition’s history.
  • That same year, Mia Love got attention as the first black Republican woman in Congress.
  • And in the legal world, 2015 brought us Paulette Browne, who was named the first woman of color to become president of the American Bar Association.
  • Last year, Misty Copeland was the first African American woman to be named principal dancer in the American Ballet Theater’s 75-year history.
  • Also in 2015, Viola Davis became the first African American actress to take home an Emmy award for Outstanding Actress in a Drama Series, and quoted civil rights activist Harriet Tubman in her acceptance speech.
  • The U.S. Senate made Loretta Lynch the first Black female attorney general in 2015.
  • Last year, actress and recording star Zendaya not only spoke out against stereotypes about African American hair, she also teamed up with Mattel to create the first Black Barbie doll with a natural hair style. “When I was little, I couldn’t find a Barbie who looked like me. My…how times have changed,” she said.

We have so much to learn from the leaders who have shaped our world, and we’re excited to fill our social media feeds this Black History Month with a showcase of Black women who changed our world in decades past as well as some who continue to do so today. For inspiration from some of the greatest, ranging from Coretta Scott King to Serena Williams, join us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram!

Tag Cloud

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 186 other followers

%d bloggers like this: